To get: free TOEFL Tips Emails, then Become a Free Member

TOEFL Tip #156: The Grammar You Need For A High TOEFL Writing Score

by Strictly English TOEFL Tutors on May 25, 2012

Following up on a recent post, we’re getting down to the nitty-gritty about “intermediate English.”

Anyone studying for the TOEFL exam understands that many aspects of English play a significant role in your TOEFL Writing score: grammar, spelling, vocabulary, idiom use, sentence structure, argument, logic, transitions, relevant details, clear thesis, paragraph breaks, punctuation, etc. But if we wanted to look at just the role that grammar plays in your score, you might be surprised by the following information.

Initially, you might think that TOEFL aligns its scores (0-30) according to the level of English. For example:

0-3= Low Beginner
4-7 = Beginner
8-11 =High Beginner
12-15 = Low Intermediate
16-19 = Intermediate
19-22 = High Intermediate
23-26 = Advanced
27-30 Fluent

But this might not be true. For example, you don’t need to be fluent if you want a 27 on the Writing section. In fact, all you need is intermediate grammatical structures with very few errors.

Good to know, right?

But even with this information, there is still a lot to think about regarding grammar: verb tense, article use, sentence structure, word order, etc. We can’t cover all of these in this one blog entry, so let’s just look at one thing on this list: sentence structure.

Basically, the more common sentence structure for intermediate grammar is the “compound” sentence. Here is a brief explanation of sentence structure:

One way to categorize sentences in English is as follows:

  • Simple
  • Compound
  • Complex

SIMPLE SENTENCES have one clause. For example: I went to the store.

COMPOUND SENTENCES have two or more independent clauses joined by a coordinating conjunction (e.g., “and”, ‘but”, “or”). For example: Fred ate dinner, and Zhen watched TV.

PLEASE NOTE: the word “and” does not always indicate a compound sentence. For example, look at this sentence: Yuki and Alejandro both ate cake and cookies. It has the word AND in it twice, but these ANDs are not connecting two clauses; the first AND is only connecting two subjects (Yuki and Alejandro), and the second AND is only connecting two direct objects (cake and cookies). Therefore, this sentence is actually a SIMPLE sentence with a “compound subject” and a “compound direct object”.

COMPLEX SENTENCES have two or more clauses, one of which is dependent. For example: If the storm comes, we’ll close the windows. Here, “If the storm comes” is the dependent clause. If you need to learn more about dependent clauses, then please click here.

So, if you can write compound sentences with few or no spelling or punctuation errors, then you can get a 27 on the test!

Remember, though, just because the writing is intermediate, doesn’t mean that intermediate students will have an easy time scoring a 27. This is because intermediate students are still learning compound structures and make a lot of mistakes with them. So, the best candidate to try this technique is an advanced student who can write masterful compound sentences that are free from error and use engaging and precise vocabulary.