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ETS Suspension in UK

by Strictly English TOEFL Tutors on March 21, 2014

Here is ETS’s latest update about their suspension in the UK:

 

20 March 2014

Dear Colleague:

In an effort to keep you informed of activities related to TOEFL® testing, we are writing to provide an update on the status of the U.K. Home Office suspension of ETS’s license.

As you know, investigations into the visa application process in the U.K. have found evidence of fraud at two test centers where ETS’s TOEIC® tests are conducted. The ETS license was suspended and, because the license covers both programs, the suspension applied to the TOEFL test as well as the TOEIC test. Since the suspension, ETS has been working closely with the Home Office to provide information and a remediation plan for TOEIC visa testing. Because discussions are progressing but not yet concluded, the Home Office has decided to extend the suspension, which applies to both the TOEFL and TOEIC tests, until 1 April 2014.

The following remains true:

  • TOEFL testing continues to be available in the U.K. for non-visa related purposes.
  • TOEFL scores still may not be used for visa purposes by students already in the U.K.
  • TOEFL scores continue to be acceptable for students from everywhere else in the world.

We will continue to keep you updated as more information is received. This message is being sent from an unmonitored mailbox. Questions may be directed to sbhangal@etsglobal.org.

Best regards,

Eileen Tyson
Executive Director, Global Client Relations

Sandy Bhangal
Associate Director, Global Client Relations, U.K.

Educational Testing Service
Rosedale Road
Princeton, NJ 08541

 

Pharmacist Boards Raise Minimum TOEFL Requirements

by Strictly English TOEFL Tutors on March 19, 2014

The National Association of Boards of Pharmacy will be changing its minimum TOEFL score in the next few months from a total of 93 to a total of 97.

Two of the four sub-scores are also changing:

The minimum sub-score for the Reading is increasing 1 point from a 21 to a 22.

The minimum sub-score for the Listening is increasing 3 points from an 18 to a 21.

Thankfully, the Speaking and the Writing sub-scores are not changing.

These changes go into effect at different times this year depending on how much of the pharmacist-application process you have already completed. For complete details, read more here.

To help pharmacists complete their TOEFL before these changes go into effect, Strictly English will be offering tutoring in Reading and Listening strategies for 50% off our regular prices to any pharmacist who signs up before April 1, 2014!

SIGN UP TODAY!

TOEFL TIP #214: Strictly English’s TOEFL Guarantee Program

by Strictly English TOEFL Tutors on October 3, 2013

Have you taken the TOEFL multiple times, only to be a few points away from the score you need? Are you wondering what it will take to get those last few points?

Strictly English has a new program that will help you get the scores you need – the TOEFL Guarantee. If you have a TOEFL score from within the past 3 months, and you know that the score you’re trying to reach is no more than 4 points higher per section than your current score, this program is designed to work with you until you pass.

Working with dedicated tutors, you’ll take 3 classes per week, and a third-party practice test (such as from ETS or Testden) every 2 weeks. Once you reach the score you want in one section of the exam, you’ll keep studying for the other sections until you pass all sections. Send your test scores directly to Strictly English so we can keep track of your progress!

 We guarantee that we’ll keep tutoring you until you pass, for ONE flat price! 

For full details, including pricing, visit the TOEFL Guarantee Program page. Ready to enroll? Contact us today! 

$1 for Online Writing Class!

by Strictly English TOEFL Tutors on August 7, 2013

Strictly English is having a sale on its ONLINE GROUP WRITING CLASS. We call it STRICTLY ENGLISH STUDY HALL and it’s only $1 a hour for a text-based writing class in which the student writes an essay ONE sentence at a time and gets immediate feedback on each sentence. The goal is to write one perfect sentence before continuing on to the next one. It is VERY effective!
Here is a video that shows you how it works:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=skvgZYOM8rU
These $1 classes are on Sunday AUG 11 and Monday AUG 12 every other hour starting at 9am!
Please call or email if you have any questions!

TOEFL Tip #213: Inference Is King!

by Strictly English TOEFL Tutors on July 26, 2013

An important key for doing well on the TOEFL exam is understanding how the exam is set up. TOEFL is NOT designed for test-takers to find information as if the exam were an Easter egg hunt with relevant information scattered throughout it. Instead, it’s designed for you to derive information through critical thinking skills.

We know there are fact questions and inference questions, and to the native speaker these are starkly different. Fact questions for a particular passage are similar to an Easter egg hunt. Like Easter eggs hidden in tall grass or behind a rock, the answers to fact questions are in the passage, but may be tricky to find. If you look carefully enough, however, you will be able to locate them. Inference questions require critical thinking skills. You have to put together pieces of information in the passage to infer something that the passage does not directly state. For example, if the passage states that the weather has been rainy for several weeks, and that it’s spring, you can infer that spring has rainy weather.

But sadly, only the most fluent of non-native English speakers will find FACT questions as simple as looking for a truth that is explicitly stated on the page. To be sure: the truth IS THERE, but it is buried under tricky vocabulary, confusing phrasal verbs, or advanced grammar. So it’s a fact question for a native Speaker, but ultimately it becomes an inference question for anyone who doesn’t know all of the vocabulary or who has never encountered the idiomatic expressions used.

Consequently, even though there may be only 1 or 2 questions per passage explicitly identified as INFERENCE questions (those are the ones that have the word “IMPLY” or “INFER” in the question), there might be 8-10 questions that require the same critical thinking skills as does a question explicitly identified as “inference.”

Therefore, studying critical thinking skills and lateral thinking skills will be very useful when preparing for the TOEFL. Our recent posts about absolute modifiers in general and modal verbs in particular demonstrate how critical thinking can help you to choose the correct answers. Similarly, this post on the limits of memorized answers points out the need to evaluate the information on the TOEFL exam, rather than attempting to memorize answers that you can plug into the prompts for the Speaking and Writing sections. This Wikipedia entry describes lateral thinking, and here are some exercises to challenge you!

TOEFL Tip #212: Avoiding Absolute Modifiers: Modal Verbs

by Strictly English TOEFL Tutors on July 21, 2013

In last week’s post, we talked about the importance of avoiding absolute answers on the TOEFL exam. TOEFL wants to avoid making its answers too easy with choices such as ALWAYS or NEVER. Instead, TOEFL wants test-takers to have to think carefully about the question and evaluate which answer is the best choice.

 

In addition to adverbs like “always” and “never,” English grammar also uses modal verbs to indicate a suggested or required action. A “modal verb,” sometimes called a “helper verb,” is a word that adds further meaning to the primary verb in a sentence. The main group of modal verbs is can, could, may, might, must, ought, shall, should, will, would.

 

So how can you use modal verbs to avoid choosing absolute answers, and increase your chances of picking the correct answer?  Think about the modal verbs on a sliding scale, with suggestions at one end, and requirements at the other end.

 

On this scale, “can” and “could” are at the suggestion end of the scale, indicating that it is possible to take the action of the verb, but not indicating whether the subject will do it. Think of these as a 20% requirement. 

Other modal verbs on the sliding scale increase the necessity for the sentence’s subject to do what the verb says. “Might” indicates that subject has a choice about whether to do the verb’s action, perhaps a 40% requirement. “Should” and “ought” are very strong suggestions, with a sense of obligation to do what the verb says – 80% requirement. “Must” indicates a required action, one that the subject has no choice about; it’s a 100% requirement.

 

Here is a series of example, using illnesses: 

If you feel dizzy, you CAN lie down for a few minutes.

If you have a sinus infection, you MIGHT want to see a doctor.

If you have the flu, you SHOULD go to the doctor.

If you have cancer, you MUST go to the doctor.

 Since the TOEFL exam avoids answers that indicate 100%, definitely avoid answers that use “must.” Because “should” and “ought” are strong suggestions, you probably want to think carefully about choices with those words. “Should” and “ought” could be the correct answers if the issue in the question is serious enough. Use your judgment, but in general, “might” and “could” will be safe bets.

 

 

TOEFL Tip #211: TOEFL Avoids Absolute Modifiers Throughout The Test

by Strictly English TOEFL Tutors on July 12, 2013

A common strategy for multiple choice exams such as the TOEFL is to try to eliminate one or more answers per question before selecting the answer you think is correct. By avoiding obviously-wrong choices, you can improve your chances of answering the question correctly.

But, if you’re not confident that you know the answer, how can you figure out which answers are obviously wrong?

In general, it’s best to be suspicious of answer choices on the Reading and Listening that indicate absolute conditions, or 100% agreement/disagreement about a topic. Words like these 

never
always
must
can’t
entirely

are red flags.

WHY does the TOEFL exam use these words in answers that are probably wrong?

Remember that the TOEFL is a test of your skill in English. If the answers are too obvious, then it would be very easy to pick answer choices as right or wrong.

So, TOEFL wants to challenge the test-taker. It’s better to present content that is full of POSSIBILITIES so that the test-taker struggles to decide MAYBE the correct answer is THIS or MAYBE it’s THAT.  Words like the ones listed above reduce, rather than expand, possibilities in an answer, and that makes them more likely to be wrong answers on the TOEFL.

Is it fair for TOEFL to use tricks like this one?

YES! As Benjamin Franklin is often credited as saying, “In this world, nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.” If the real world is not 100%, then how can TOEFL be 100%?

We at Strictly English applaud TOEFL for basing their exam on this fundamental truth of life and of critical engagement! Think twice before choosing the easy, obvious answer!

 

TOEFL Tip #210: Paraphrasing Out Of Order Is Easier

by Strictly English TOEFL Tutors on June 29, 2013

As we’ve noted before, paraphrasing is an essential skill on the TOEFL exam. You need to be able to rephrase ideas you read and hear on the exam to avoid repetition and to demonstrate your mastery of English.

Today’s post focuses on word order when you are paraphrasing. Paraphrasing is not only about replacing one word with another in the same sentence structure. Good paraphrasing preserves the meaning of the sentence while also rearranging and changing its grammar.

Paraphrasing is easier if you can separate the parts of the sentence and recombine them. Trying thinking of the elements in a sentence like playing cards that can be shuffled:

1. Identify the KEY WORDS in a sentence (verbs, negatives, subjects, and direct objects). Do not focus on grammar elements (prepositions, articles, suffixes, etc).

2. Write each keyword on separate pieces of paper.

3. On the back side of each piece of paper, write a synonym for that word.

4. Shuffle your papers with the key words, and lay them out in a random new order with the synonym side facing up.

5. Try to write a sentence using this new order and conveying the same meaning.

6. Shuffle the papers again and make a second paraphrase.

 Here’s an example from the beeoasis.com article, “Simplifying Complexity.”

“We’re discovering in nature that simplicity often lies on the other side of complexity.”

1. The key words are “we,” “discovering,” “nature,” “simplicity,” “often,” “lies,” “other side,” “complexity.”

2. Index cards are great for this exercise, but any small pieces of paper will do.

3. Synonyms could be “scientists,” “finding out,” “natural world,” “simple” “frequent” “exists” “opposite side” “complex”

4. New shuffled order, using the synonyms:  natural world frequent finding out scientists simple exist complex opposite

5. A paraphrase based on this new order: “In the natural world, a frequent finding by scientists is that simple things exist as complex things’ opposite side.”  (Notice that the verb “finding out” has been switched to the noun “finding,” so that the sentence is grammatically correct.)

6. Shuffle again, and a second paraphrase: complex simple natural world scientists frequent finding out opposite side exists

“The difference between something that is complex and something that is simple in the natural world, scientists are frequently finding out, is that these are opposite sides of existence.” (Again, notice that the form of “exists” changes to suit the new sentence.)

 

Shuffling the synonyms and making a new sentence with the words in a new order will challenge your grammar, and will strengthen your ability to think of several ways to express one idea. How many different paraphrases can you make with one sentence? Give us your examples in the comments!

TOEFL Tip #209: Compare A News Story In English AND In Your Language

by Strictly English TOEFL Tutors on June 22, 2013

 

Strictly English is a strong proponent of using news sources to improve your English. You can improve your listening and reading skills by reading the news. The more you immerse yourself in English, the more thoroughly English will become your second language.

 

This post expands on an idea mentioned in our discussion of using 360 Research to improve your English. As you read about one news story in a variety of sources, observe the level of formality for the English used in each source. A story in The New York Times, for example, will use formal English, but someone’s blog post will likely more causal. Twitter or Facebook are even more causal.

 

How can you know if a writer or speaker is using English formally or informally?

 Look at the grammar and word choice. Formal English doesn’t use contractions or slang expressions; sentences are always complete, and the vocabulary is sophisticated. Informal English often uses contractions, text-speak abbreviations (LOL), and other slang phrases. Sentences may not be complete, and vocabulary is often simple.

 

Also, context is often useful for understanding how formally or informally someone is speaking or writing. Writing a blog that your friends will read is different from writing a newspaper story for the general public. The blog might make jokes, or exaggerate a particular aspect of the story, or use colorful vocabulary; the newspaper story doesn’t. Understanding the differences between those two audiences will help you to notice the different levels of English.

 

This is important for the TOEFL exam because you should be using a fairly formal level of English in your written and spoken answers. This shows stronger mastery of English, and an ability to choose the right level of English for the right audience.

 

So, as you are reading and listening to various sources of English, be sure to take note of how the writers and speakers differ from each other.

TOEFL TIP #208: Crossword Puzzles Improve Your Vocabulary

by Strictly English TOEFL Tutors on June 14, 2013

Crossword puzzles are great tools for building your active vocabulary. A crossword puzzle is a grid with blank spaces to fill in words across (left to right) and down (top to bottom). Each word has a clue, and as you fill in the crossword, the letters from one word help you to fill in another word that intersects with it.

 The daily crossword puzzle in The New York Times is well-known, and Monday’s puzzle is the easiest. By contrast, the Sunday Times puzzle is famous for its difficulty! With the following rules, a student with intermediate-level English can do a New York Times Monday puzzle. Practice vocabulary with a crossword puzzle to vary your study routine!

 1. Know the crossword puzzle rules:

  • Answers are the same grammatical form as the clues. A plural clue will have a plural answer, so you can put an “S” in the answer’s last box.
  • Similarly, tenses must match, so a past tense clue must have a past tense answer.
  • Remember phrasal verbs, so a clue for “dispersed” could have the answer “handed out.”
  • Abbreviations in clues means the answer is an abbreviation, so a clue of “Headed the CIA” would be “JEH” for J. Edgar Hoover.

2.  When it’s just a fact – especially a person’s name – use Google!  So a clue, “Won the swimming gold in 2012″ can be found in Google, and that will help you fill in some letters for words that “cross” the Olympics answer.

3. Look at word patterns instead of the clue. The clue “gregarious” may not help you very much, but if you have some letters already filled in, then you might figure out the answer. For example, this answer might be partially filled in as:

t a _ k _ t i v _

and we know that TALK is a common work in English and we know that TIVE is a common suffix in English. And we know that the letter between the “K” and the “T” has to be a VOWEL (a, e, i, o, u).

The best part is that the New York Times repeats words often, so you see them again days later, which helps you to remember them!  For example, you’ll see ALOE at least 5 times within the first month of doing crosswords, so you’ll be sure to remember what it means!

 

 

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